2011 Frontiers in Neuroscience Summer Course
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    2011 Frontiers in Neuroscience Summer Course

  • [2011-11-17]
  • The USTC Frontiers in Neuroscience Summer Course took placein the Lecture Hall of the Lobby of the Life Sciences Building on August 2nd to August 6th. The 5-day concentrated course featured lectures by internationally renowned neuroscientists, including Dr. LiqunLuo from StanfordUniversity, also a distinguished alumnus of USTC, Dr. WeiminZhong from Yale University, Dr. Yutian Wang from University of British Columbia, and Dr. Yang Dan from University of California, Berkeley. More than one hundred undergrad and grad students attended the course. The five-day course is part of the Innovative GraduateEducation Project supported by the Graduate School of USTC.

    Neuroscience is a fast movingfrontier of sciences. The distinguished lecturers of the summer course are world-class experts who have made remarkable achievements in the fields ofmolecular and cellular neuroscience, neural development, neural plasticity,as well as systems and cognitive science.Their lecturesintroduced the fascinating world of neuroscience as well as theirowncutting-edge research results to the audience, and have benefited both students and faculty members at USTC.

     Professor LiqunLuo

    Professor WeiminZhong

    Professor Yang Dan

    Professor Yutian Wang

    The course also featured a half-day mini-symposiumonNeural Development Disease, with seminars given by Professors Lin Mei andWen-chengXiong from Georgia Health Sciences University, and ProfessorsHongjun Song and Guo-li Ming from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. They shared their latest work with the audience, and broadened students’ horizon in neuroscience.

    Interactions

    Arranged by the School of Life Sciences, the 2011 Frontiers in Neuroscience Summer Course has gained great support from Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale and CAS Key Laboratory of Brain Function and Disease, and will have promoting lasting effect in USTC graduate teaching and research training in neuroscience.

     

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